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20130124
20130124
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
-hour -- the british prime minister since a shock wave through the eu, promising a referendum on britain's membership. >> time to cobble together a coalition after the israeli prime minister just scrapes through with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one tha
down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above all by his openness. we've always been a country that reaches out that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. as today as it's always been. independent, yes, but open to. i never want us to put it to drawbridge and retreat from the world. i'm not a british isolationist, but i want a better deal for britain. i wanted better deal if the fantasy british prime minister for the future of the european union. a future in which wants and should want to play committed an active part. now some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the midst to be deep crisis. why raise questions about britain's role would support in britain is already so did. there are always choices that they don't raise the difficult questions, but it is essent
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
early to say. i think the eu has taken action, the situation is much more stabilized, uncertainties have reduced. so i think we are on the right path for further growth. >> it's going to be a reasonably good year. if you exclude europe, i would say it's going to be a good year for the industry, but when you include europe, it's going to be exceptionally good. we are looking at the car market with the construction of 8%. we are protecting 3% of construction for 2013. i don't think in europe we are still in the recovery mode. except europe, growth everywhere. >> you see the different twist or europe in particular dpifg more stability. it's about combining different disabilities to reboost growth. >> all right. the final quote there coming back little by little, maria. >> yeah. a big diversified group of executives talking about the environment. joining us right now is the ceo of coca-cola, muhtar. it's great to see you. >> great to see you. >> what do you think? >> well, we continue to see opportunities everywhere in the world, the kind of opportunities are continuing to contract the code
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
. it will be in in/out referendum. >> under the terms of his proposal, cameron's eu referendum won't take place in -- unless he wins reelection in 2015. the israeli military continues to carry out deadly attacks in the occupied west bank. in the latest incident, a 21- year-old palestinian woman was killed and another local youth wounded when israeli forces opened fire at a school. a witness said the slain victim, lubna hanash, was standing with a group of companions when they came under fire. >> to that is really soldiers traveling in a white car quited their weapons, shooting indiscriminately at a college where the women were standing at the entrance. they shot repeople. -- they shot three people. >> lubna hanash was laid to rest at a funeral in her home town of bethlehem after hehours after hr death. she was one of several unmarked palestinians killed by israeli troops this month. new figures show the percentage of u.s. unionized workers has reached its lowest point in 76 years. according to the bureau of labor statistics, 11.3% of u.s. workers belonged to a union in 2012, down from 11.8% the
.s. china and e.u. posted strong economic data, all of that news lifted oil futures 72 crepts settling at 95.95 a barrel. kerry gave little hints about the pipelines today. he was asked about the initial approval in the confirmation hearing, and he said, quote, i'll make the appropriate judgment on the pipeline after the state department completes its review. natural gas output resumes at the site of the hostage crisis in the next few days, but not returning to full capacity for another month. all right. up next, worst state ever. a woman hooks up with a guy through match.com, and then he tries to kill her. now she's suing match for $10 million. is this a legal game changer for the online dating industry which is huge? we've got details. plus, some chicago and new york city officials rake in so much overtime pay that is dwarfs their actual salaries. it is so ridiculous it's bringing together me and the guy who i disagree with on basically everything. how can it be stopped? stay there for more "money." ♪ look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels.
be talking about the e.u. or you could be talking about washington. we will flip a coin with cnbc's andrew ross sorkin when he joins us live from davos, switzerland. next on "now." [ male announcer ] there's a story behind the silver of philadelphia cream cheese. it always begins with fresh, local milk, blended with real wholesome cream. going fresh from the farm, to our fridge, in just six days. because we believe in fresh taste. that's the way we set the standard for intensely rich, luscious flavor. so our story of fresh taste always ends... deliciously. when it comes to taste, philadelphia sets the standard. >>> the white house announced today that the president will renominate richard kcordrake and tap mary joe white to lead the s.e.c. as the president tries to bring stability and reform to american financial dealings, republicans seem intent on keeping the country's economy as unstable as possible. the house averted the debt ceiling fight. at least some republicans. 33 members of the house gop still broke rank. by averting, we, of course, mean punting the ticking time bomb three month
weeks s. 250eu78. when one side knows that with 41 votes they can absolutely trash can something, why should they compromise? if they've got the 41 votes. again, i want to emphasize another act about my proposal. republicans have stated that filibuster are necessary because democrats increasingly employ procedural mar maneuvers to pret them from offering amendments. i offered guarantee rights to offer amendments filed in advance of a cloture vote so everyone knows what's coming, the right -- the inherent right of the minority to offer those raiments. -- amendments. unfortunately, of course, every republican voted against my proposal and that is because republicans currently want the best of both worlds; the right to offer nongermane amendments and the right to obstruct. this doesn't make sense. again, no one should be fooled. the fact is that the radicals who now hold sway in the republican party are not concerned with make the government or senate function better. that's why the current use of the filibuster has nothing to do with ensuring minority rights to debate or the right to am
cameron speaking this morning. does that have any impact on your business? >> it does in a way. because u.s./eu trade is the one trade agreement that the u.s. has not done. that the europeans desperately need to get done. >> right. so the uk being part of that yes or no i would venture to say our government is going to have a lot to stay about the uk staying part of the eu i think as has been indicated. >> did you catch any of the comments about tax avoidance, sort of global tax avoidance issue? >> no, i did not. i'll stay quiet on that one. >> the other big topic here, energy. >> yes. >> and in particular, the u.s. energy situation, shale, fracking, et cetera, you bullish, you bearish, where do you think we really are? i mean people have prognosticated for now awhile that we were going to get there but doesn't seem like we're there. >> andrew, i think it is the bull case for the world. so to answer your question, i'm billish. and i think it's a game changer. and i think it is probably the story of global economic recovery if handled right. and frankly, the beneficiaries of that will be the u.s
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)